Page 1 of 1

code signing

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 11:23 pm
by scandiainn
Seems to run just fine but I get this after a shutdown and have to reopen app:

Unable to validate the code signature for helper tool: /Applications/Utilities/IPNetMonitorX folder/IPNetMonitorX.app/Contents/MacOS/Authorize

I have a vague recollection how to handle this under Snow Leopard but thought I would ask since I am now Lion... ha. ha.

Thanks,
Bill

Re: code signing

PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 5:25 am
by psichel_adm
That just means the file has been modified somehow so the signature didn't match. My suggestion is to choose "Quit" so IPNetMonitorX will re-install its helper tools. If that doesn't work, try re-installing the application on your system.

Kind Regards,

- Peter

Re: code signing

PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:37 am
by huezang
I understand what you are saying but I think there should be more comments regarding the threat that was initially started so that the pool of thoughts is attracted. Regards.

Re: code signing

PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:47 am
by psichel_adm
I'm not sure what you are asking here. There's lots of information about Apple's code signing rules available on the web. IPNetMonitorX is a little different from most applications in that it requires a collection of small single purpose helper tools that run with root privileges in order or access system wide networking information. To minimize the risk of exploit, these tools are intentionally kept small and limited in what they do.

In recently versions of Mac OS X, Apple has tightened the code signing rules such that each executable component within an application package must be separately signed. In addition, Network Kernel Extensions require a separate entitlement so only a small number of known developers are authorized to sign them. If a typical developer were to have their private signing key stolen, they still could not sign a kernel extension.

Apple also introduced a better code signing technique (v2) and newer systems require this. From a developers perspective, keeping up with Apple's code signing requirements is an ongoing effort that takes some time away from other tasks.

From a user's perspective, some older programs no longer validate as being properly code signed. This could mean the software was somehow modified whether by accident or design. The other explanation is that the software no longer complies with Apple's latest code signing requirements and should be updated to ensure they are safe from Apple's point of view.

Kind Regards,

- Peter